Discussion: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Family Settings Versus Individual

Discussion: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Family Settings Versus Individual

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Whether used with individuals or families, the goal of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is to modify client behavior. Although CBT for families is similar to CBT for individuals, there are significant differences in their applications. As you develop treatment plans, it is important that you recognize these differences and how they may impact your therapeutic approach with families. For this Discussion, as you compare the use of CBT for families and individuals, consider challenges of applying this therapeutic approach to your own client families.

To prepare:

· Review the media, Johnson Family Session 3, in this week’s Learning Resources

and consider the insights provided on CBT in family therapy.

· Reflect on your practicum experiences with CBT in family and individual settings.

N: B. The video for Johnson Family Episode 3 Program Transcript is ATTACHED

WITH THIS ASSIGNMENT INCASE YOU CAN NOT ACCESS THE VIDEO.

ASSIGNMENT

Post an explanation of how the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in families compares to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in individual settings. Provide specific examples from your own practicum experiences. Then, explain challenges counselors might encounter when using CBT in the family setting. Support your position with specific examples from this week’s media.

Learning Resources

Required Readings

Wheeler, K. (Ed.). (2014). Psychotherapy for the advanced practice psychiatric nurse: A how-to guide for evidence-based practice. New York, NY: Springer.

Chapter 12, “Family Therapy” (Review pp. 429–468.)
Nichols, M. (2014). The essentials of family therapy (6th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

Chapter 10, “Cognitive-Behavior Family Therapy” (pp. 166–189)
Chapter 12, “Solution-Focused Therapy” (pp. 225–242)
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, DC: Author.

Bond, C., Woods, K., Humphrey, N., Symes, W., & Green, L. (2013). Practitioner review: The effectiveness of solution focused brief therapy with children and families: A systematic and critical evaluation of the literature from 1990–2010. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry, 54(7), 707–723. doi:10.1111/jcpp.12058

Conoley, C., Graham, J., Neu, T., Craig, M., O’Pry, A., Cardin, S., & … Parker, R. (2003). Solution-focused family therapy with three aggressive and oppositional-acting children: An N=1 empirical study. Family Process, 42(3), 361–374. doi:10.1111/j.1545-5300.2003.00361.x

de Castro, S., & Guterman, J. (2008). Solution-focused therapy for families coping with suicide. Journal of Marital & Family Therapy, 34(1), 93–106. doi:10.111/j.1752-0606.2008.00055.x

Patterson, T. (2014). A cognitive behavioral systems approach to family therapy. Journal of Family Psychotherapy, 25(2), 132–144. doi:10.1080/08975353.2014.910023

Perry, A. (2014). Cognitive behavioral therapy with couples and families. Sexual & Relationship Therapy, 29(3), 366–367. doi:10.1080/14681994.2014.909024

Ramisch, J., McVicker, M., & Sahin, Z. (2009). Helping low-conflict divorced parents establish appropriate boundaries using a variation of the miracle question: An integration of solution-focused therapy and structural family therapy. Journal of Divorce & Remarriage, 50(7), 481–495. doi:10.1080/10502550902970587

Washington, K. T., Wittenberg-Lyles, E., Oliver, D. P., Baldwin, P. K., Tappana, J., Wright, J. H., & Demiris, G. (2014). Rethinking family caregiving: Tailoring cognitive-behavioral therapies to the hospice experience. Health & Social Work, 39(4), 244–250. doi:10.1093/hsw/hlu031

Required Media

Laureate Education (Producer). (2013c). Johnson family session 3 [Video file]. Author: Baltimore, MD.

Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 5 minutes.

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