Explain Europe’s impact on the Americas

Explain Europe’s impact on the Americas Essay Exam
5 paragraph essay exam

minimum word-count requirement of 350 words but should be between 400-600 words.

The first paragraph should introduce the topic and contain a thesis statement. It should contain between three-five (3-5) complete sentences, including the thesis statement.

The second, third, and fourth paragraphs are the body paragraphs. Each body paragraph should contain between three-five (3-5) sentences, including the topic sentence (first sentence of the body paragraph, states a main point that supports the thesis) and at least two-three (2-3) specific examples per main point.

The fifth and final paragraph should begin with a restatement of the thesis. It should be three-five (3-5) complete sentences, and include a brief summary/conclusion of the student’s answer to the essay question.

You are not required to do outside research for these essays but if you choose to do so, the usual source standards apply (no encyclopedias or dictionaries). You must cite any course materials used and any outside sources used and include a bibliography after each essay.

Exam question:

  1. Explain Europe’s impact on the Americas (Covered in Lesson 1)

Thesis statement:

Topic Ideas:

Philosophical influence, revolution, treacherous leaders, forced religion. industrialization

Revolution- political, agricultural (enclosure acts), religious

Philosophical- Hobbes & Locke’s influences on human rights and the declaration of independence.

Religious freedom enabled by a form of government lead by the people for the people.

Establishment of class?

The people and events which occurred in Europe during the (insert time period here) had great influence on the Americas. European philosophers such as, Hobbes, Locke, and (others) influenced on the development of American government and supporting documentation, lessons learned from the Monarchy of King George- freedom of religion, and third reason (?)

Week 2 – Economies and Cultures Please make sure you go to the titles below for this weeks readings using the link below. Maddison – http://site.ebrary.com/lib/apus/docDetail.action?docID=10211867

  • In Chapter 2 Read – The European Transformation of the Americas pages 87-102 (5 Pages)

References:

http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~tarr22v/classweb/modernsocialism/marxiantheory.html

Agriculture Revolution had a great impact on European society, it has many great accomplishments but there were a few downfalls. Discuss these downfalls. Examples. The British agricultural revolution transformed farming throughout the world. Many of those changes are still prevalent today. This revolution as created many new farming techniques such as crop rotation and selective breeding, and machines, such as the seed drill. Though as a whole, food was plentiful which lead to nourished citizens and hence the population grew. The growing population, while a good thing, lead to more competition for land and resources. Prior to the passage of Enclosure Acts, many village families shared the workload farming open fields and letting cattle graze on common lands. Though open fields were advantageous for the less wealthy commoners, they provided an environment where diseases spread rapidly amongst livestock and vegetation. Towns agreeing to transition to enclosed fields left many farmers impoverished. They no longer had land to farm and could not yield enough crops in comparison to those with enclosed fields. This led to many farmers moving to villages whom had not yet agreed to enclosure or into industrial vocations. Therefore, enclosure, which was originally sold to citizens as opportunities for improvement, “was directly responsible for rural depopulation and the decline of small farmers.” (Fairlie, 2009). “main advantage of private ownership is freedom, since the use of goods can be more directly tailored to the needs of the individual.” (Fairlie, 2009). When enclosure came about, it introduced overstocking and economic growth. It provided income for large scale farms and attributed to the relocation and deterioration of small scale farmers, as mentioned above. Author Wendy McElroy discussed enclosure saying, the immediate advantage went to “those fortunate enough to become individual owners” while the disadvantage devastated ”the peasant class.” (2012). She further explained that “When access was systematically denied, ultimately the peasantry was left with three basic alternatives: to work in a serf-like manner as tenant farmers for large landowners; to emigrate to the New World; or, ultimately, to pour into already-crowded cities, where they pushed down each others’ wages by competing for a limited number of jobs.” (McElroy, 2010).

I do believe that John Locke greatly influenced Thomas Jefferson, especially when referring to the creation of the Declaration of Independence. The research I did on Thomas Hobbes to answer question two, explained that Hobbes too believed people have inalienable rights. Many philosophers who’ve studied human nature have concluded that people are born with certain rights. Their observations and life experiences determine their ideology of natural rights and explain why their views differ. Hobbs, not unlike Locke and Jefferson believed that people had the right to protect themselves and their property. Locke used Hobbs’ ideals of human rights and the social contract to build his idea that a government with the consent of the people, should be used to preserve one’s rights to self-preservation by protecting their life, health and property (Pirie, 2009, p. 76). Where Locke differed from other philosophers was in his belief individuals have a duty to respect one another and additionally, that government must in turn respect the rights of individuals. This duty is what is known as natural law (Forde, 2011). In his

As Locke stated in his work, Two Treaties of Civil Government in 1764,

“The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one: and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind, who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions: for men being all the workmanship of one omnipotent, and infinitely wise maker; all the servants of one sovereign master, sent into the world by his order, and about his business; they are his property, whose workmanship they are, made to last[198] during his, not one another’s pleasure: and being furnished with like faculties, sharing all in one community of nature, there cannot be supposed any such subordination among us, that may authorize us to destroy one another, as if we were made for one another’s uses, as the inferior ranks of creatures are for our’s. Every one, as he is bound to preserve himself, and not to quit his station wilfully, so by the like reason, when his own preservation comes not in competition, ought he, as much as he can, to preserve the rest of mankind, and may not, unless it be to do justice on an offender, take away, or impair the life, or what tends to the preservation of the life, the liberty, health, limb, or goods of another.”

This paragraph alone, states Locke’s belief in one’s right to life and liberty. Which as you stated above, is quoted directly in Jefferson’s version of the Declaration of Independence. Hence, I would say that Locke had great influence on Jefferson’s work.

References:

Pirie, M. (2009). 101 great philosophers : makers of modern thought. Retrieved from https://ebookcentral-proquest-com.ezproxy2.apus.edu

Forde, S. (2011). John Locke and the Natural Law and Natural Rights Tradition. Retrieved from http://www.nlnrac.org/earlymodern/locke

Locke, J. (1764). Two Treatises of Government, ed. Thomas Hollis (London: A. Millar et al., 1764). Retrieved from http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/locke-the-two-treatises-of-civil-government-hollis-ed

Hobbes’ idea of natural equality of men was that individuals have rights which are inalienable or inherent to them and this is still a common thought today. One example of this that can be seen today is a term that many military members are familiar with when referring to the rules of engagement is “the inherent right to self-defense.” This ties to his thoughts on the state of nature, in which if no rules apply or a moral of ethic exists, one will do what they see fit to protect what is theirs and thus a war against all would ensue.

Hobbes also believed in the importance of the consent of the people as a basis for the foundation of the state (Guerrero, 2017a).

Today, we can find an example of both of these concepts in the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration of Independence summarizes the inalienable rights which are the basis of a free society, states what government is, the source for which it derives its powers, and the ability of government to protect those rights (Thomas Jefferson on Politics & Government, n.d.). Those rights are “are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” and government was created “deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.”

Hobbes’ idea of natural equality of men was that individuals have rights which are inalienable or inherent to them and this is still a common thought today. One example of this that can be seen today is a term that many military members are familiar with when referring to the rules of engagement is “the inherent right to self-defense.” This ties to his thoughts on the state of nature, in which if no rules apply or a moral of ethics exists, one will do what they see fit to protect what is theirs and thus a war against all would ensue. One’s personal ethical beliefs are kept in check by a moral code in which we live by. These moral codes are influenced by the beliefs of the person or persons developing then and they can be derived from many different cultural influences. Many societal moral codes will have supporting rules to reinforce these beliefs. For example, the Catholic religion establishes the ten commandments or in government, the creation of the Bill of Rights to support the moral codes established in the U.S. Constitution, both of which support that of the Declaration of Independence.

Hobbes also believed in the importance of the consent of the people as a basis for the foundation of the state (Guerrero, 2017a). Today, we can find an example of both of these concepts in the Declaration of Independence. The Declaration of Independence summarizes the inalienable rights which are the basis of a free society, states what government is, the source for which it derives its powers, and the ability of government to protect those rights (Thomas Jefferson on Politics & Government, n.d.). Those rights are “are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” and the government was created “deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” The Declaration of Independence explains how the sovereign, the King of Great Britain’s arbitrary despotism did not have the consent of the people nor did it embody equality.

References:

Fairlie, S. (2009). A Short History of Enclosure in Britain. The Land, Summer 2009(7). Retrieved from http://www.thelandmagazine.org.uk/articles/short-history- enclosure-britain

McElroy, W. (2012, March 8). The Enclosure Acts and the Industrial Revolution. Retrieved from https://www.fff.org/explore-freedom/article/enclosure- acts-industrial- revolution/

Weeks 1 – Ideologies and Political Structures

Pirie – Locke, Hobbes, Rousseau and Smith pages 69-70 (Hobbes), 75-76 (Locke), 97-98 (Rouseeau) and 103-105 (Smith). (5 Pages) http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://www.apus.eblib.com./patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=601914&echo=1&userid=6JnKbBJrUiE%3d&tstamp=1436319190&id=4264670C27AE6B8ECE82FA8A2071EE11E5D516AB

Hoppit – Chapter 2 – The Glorious Revolution and the Revolution Constitution – the Ascension of William and Mary to The Making of Oligarchical Politics pages 23-49 (26 pages) http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://www.netlibrary.com/urlapi.asp?action=summary&v=1&bookid=100302

Fitzpatrick – Chapter 1 – The Science and the Coming of the Enlightenment by John Henry Pages 10-25 (15 Pages) http://ezproxy.apus.edu/login?url=http://www.netlibrary.com/urlapi.asp?action=summary&v=1&bookid=115592

Thackeray and Findling Chapter 5: The Enlightenment Pages 77-82 (You will need to copy and pastethe link below into the address bar and then go to Chapter 5) (5 pages)

http://site.ebrary.com/lib/apus/docDetail.action?docID=5007272

WEBSITES – Required Reading

The Theory of Absolutism

http://www2.stetson.edu/~psteeves/classes/louisxiv.html

French Absolutism

http://www2.sunysuffolk.edu/westn/absolutism.html – Suggested Reading

Thackeray and Findling 82-94 – http://site.ebrary.com/lib/apus/docDetail.action?docID=5007272

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