Recently the pharmaceutical company Mylan attempted a hostile takeover of generic drugmaker Perrigo. Perrigo reported a net loss the year before the attempted takeover, which was partially driven by a spike in administrative expenses.

Recently the pharmaceutical company Mylan attempted a hostile takeover of generic drugmaker Perrigo. Perrigo reported a net loss the year before the attempted takeover, which was partially driven by a spike in administrative expenses. Suppose that Mylan perceives there is a 70 percent probability that Perrigo’s loss is merely the transitory result of administrative expenses needed to fight the takeover. In this case, the present value of Perrigo’s stream of profits is $30 billion. However, Mylan perceives that there is a 30 percent chance that Perrigo’s net loss stems from long-term structural changes in the demand for Perrigo’s services, and that the present value of its profit stream is only $6 billion. You are a decision maker at Mylan and know that your current takeover bid is $21 billion. You have just learned that a rival bidder-Abbott Laboratories-perceives that there is an 80 percent probability that the present value of Perrigo’s stream of profits is $30 billion and a 20 percent probability of it being only $6 billion. Based on this information, should you increase your bid or hold firm to your $21 billion offer? Explain carefully?

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